Tragus and Anti-Tragus Piercings

Tragus piercings and anti-tragus piercings are becoming increasingly popular – in fact, tragus piercings are now one of the most common ear piercings around. Ear piercings are the most familiar form of Body piercings and the tragus and anti-tragus are fresh expressions of the mundane ear lobe piercings.

The tragus is a thick little piece of cartilage that juts out from the ear canal. To get an understanding of the exact location of the tragus, place a finger by the outer corner of your eye. From this point, trace the finger back, in a straight line, until you touch your ear. The first piece of your ear you will feel is your tragus. You should be able to grasp this little nub between your fingers – this is where the piercing will go through.

There are all sorts of misconceptions about the tragus. Some people may try to tell you that piercing your tragus will affect your balance – that is simply not true. Your balance is affected by fluids in your ear drums, which are located deep within your ears, and are far away from any pierce-able surface. The tragus does not have anything to do with your balance, so don’t be fooled by uneducated people who might try and tell you otherwise. In fact, the only purpose a tragus has is to hold your headphones (such as the standard iPod headphones) securely in your ears; and once pierced, there are thousands of headphones to choose from which will not irritate your piercing. Honestly, the tragus has nothing to do with your ear, your hearing, or your balance. It is just a flap of cartilage – perhaps if humans developed sonar and echo-location the tragus would be useful (super developed traguses help bats use sonar, for example) – but alas, on our species, it’s just a surface begging to get pierced!

The tragus is recommended to be pierced with a captive bead ring, but a barbell will suffice. The reason rings are almost always preferred for the initial piercing as opposed to barbells is because rings tend to heal quicker, better, and more securely. Once healed, you can use any type of jewelry, even typical jewelry normally reserved for ear lobes. Your piercer will help you choose which gage is right for you (and by the way, expanding the tragus is not unheard of, but rare), mark the location on your ear, and push the needle right through. Some piercers may put a cork behind the tragus to “catch” the needle, some piercers just use clamps to aid the needle through, and yet others just use their hands. Each piercer is different, so they will pierce according to their style. Clamps are the most common method, and many people report that the actually clamping to secure the skin hurts more than the piercing! The tragus piercing should be painless – there aren’t a lot of nerves there – but some people do feel slight and temporary pain. Because it is so close to the ear, some people even say they hear a little “pop!” sound as the needle pushes through. Should you hear a little noise, it’s nothing to be concerned about. Once the needle is in, the jewelry is slid into place and secured, and you are done! The whole process, from prep to finish, shouldn’t take more than five minutes.

The tragus does take a while to heal – sometimes up to a year to be fully and completely healed. Many people irritate their new piercing by placing their dirty cell phones up to their ear or by sleeping on the ear with the piercing. I suggest NOT doing either of these for at least the first six months. If your piercing does become infected (and it shouldn’t with proper aftercare), soak it in warm salt water, don’t touch it with your hands, and perhaps (using a q-tip) rub some diluted tea tree oil around the piercing. Never use any sort of rubbing alcohol, for this will irritate and scar your piercing. Your piercer will give you a complete rundown of what to expect and how to handle your new piercing though, so pay attention to their advice.

The Anti-Tragus is very similar to the tragus. It is pierced the same way, the aftercare is the same, and the healing time is the same too. To locate your anti-tragus, place a finger on your earlobe (generally where someone’s first ear piercing would be) and with your finger, draw a straight line up. The flap of cartilage you come to before the empty space is your anti-tragus. Your tragus and anti-tragus are located very close to each other, and the anti-tragus is just opposite of the tragus. Just like the other piercing, this piercing does not affect your hearing or balance. The anti-tragus is rarer than the tragus, mostly because many people don’t think they can get this area pierced, but it can be pierced and it does look great when healed. Curved Barbells and captive ring beads are used most frequently in these piercings.

If you are considering an anti-tragus or tragus piercings, be sure to use a licensed professional. Once it is fully healed, the way your ornament or decorate the piercing is completely up to you, and the jewelry possibilities are endless!

Navel Piercing Types

Centuries ago, Egyptians used to adorn themselves with different forms of body piercings. As for navel piercing, only members of the royal family were allowed to do that. Anyone else who attempted to pierce one’s navel could be sentenced to death. Modern times have been more tolerant, that is why the interest in navel piercing broke out with a new force during the 80’s and 90’s of the previous century.

These days, increasingly more people are having a navel piercing done. And of course, the reasons for having this kind of piercing differ from those of ancient times. Someone gets it for the look. Someone else wants to have a secret spot to show only to special people. If you already have your own reasons for it, it’s time to think about the type to choose.

There are some different modes of navel piercing to select from. Some of them depend on how big in size your belly is and whether your navel is placed inward or outward. According to navel location, the piercing is called “innie” or “outie.” Navel piercings are also performed on the top, bottom, or sides of the navel.

• The most largely accepted type of navel piercing is the “innie”. It’s located just above the navel plug. When correctly performed, it looks great, especially on a well-shaped abdomen. If you’re not endowed with the proper anatomy, your piercing may also be torn through the skin in case it’s too low-settled.

• The “outie” piercing is located leftward from your belly-button. It’s a rather complicated kind of navel piercing since a lot of blood vessels are concentrated inside and around this plug. On account of this, blood loss may be more abundant. As well risks of getting infected are higher.

• Upper rim is the standard kind of piercing, which is performed at the top of the navel ring.

• Lower rim is done at the bottom side of the belly button ring.

• Sides are generally called the piercings which are located on belly-button sides. These can be either left or right side, anywhere among the top and bottom sides of the navel ring.

It’s possible to have up to four piercings done to your navel. However, it doesn’t mean you can do them all at once. In such cases you get exposed to greater risks as well as more profuse bleeding. The best idea is having one navel piercing done at a time, wait for it to heal, and then think about another one.

Teardrop Piercing And How To Get One

Are you ready to get pierced again? Well, why not try the teardrop pierce? If you are feeling bold and you want something different when it comes to body piercing, you might want to try teardrop piercing. This piercing got its name because the pierced section is situated right atop the apples of your cheeks, just where teardrops usually fall. Those who get the teardrop pierce make use of the same earrings used for the belly or the brow.

Before getting this kind of piercing, here are some important things you need to take note of:

Visibility – Teardrop piercing is highly visible, unless you take off the earrings. It’s right on the ears and the hole stretches close to an inch so you can’t really use a regular earring to go through it.

Tolerance for pain – Most people say that this kind of piercing does not hurt. But in truth, it can. It actually depends on your own tolerance for pain and also the skin you have at that area. Remember that facial skin is softer and sometimes thinner than other parts of the body.

Sensitive skin – Teardrop piercing is done right on your skin. So make sure your face is not that sensitive because you will have to sanitize the piercing in two weeks time, very regularly. Make sure that you apply alcohol on the area without risking breakouts or facial allergies.

Aside from these things, you also need to take note of the person who will get the piercing done. Hygiene is very important. Make sure you are only getting pierced from a specialist who really uses clean tools. Here are some tips you can use to find the best piercing artist to do this work on you:

Ask recommendations from friends – Get in touch with your own network of friends. Ask them for their own recommendations. They might be able to give you the contact details of a good artist for the job.

Take a trip to the location – Before getting pierced, take time to actually go to the location and see how the artist will actually be doing the work on you. Does the place look clean? Do they use sanitized tools in there? Are you comfortable with the person who’s going to do the work on you? It’s also good to find a shop that’s actually near your home so that you won’t have to travel far with your fresh piercing on.

Talk with your artist – Tell your artist what you like and if you have pain issues, be upfront about it. Ask questions about teardrop piercing especially about cleaning it. They will be the best people to ask about it anyway. You can also ask if they could be the ones to provide the earring because some shops might only be willing to do the labor but will rely on your for the earrings.