Express Your Creativity With Body Jewelry By You

Jewelry-making has become more and more popular. If you are looking for something unique and truly “you” in body jewelry, consider creating your own.

There are so many creative people and so many ways to show off your artsy side. If you are into body jewelry such as belly button, nose, or eyebrow rings, did you know you could make your own? Because this type of accessory is already very affordable, you may not save money in doing so but sometimes it is more about being unique and showing the world who you are. After all, isn’t that why you got your navel or nose pierced in the first place?

Here are some ideas for getting started:

1. Take a class at your local community college. Most continuing education programs include a jewelry-making class or two. Some people learn better when they can do things hands-on but with the guidance an expert instructor can provide. Oftentimes, the cost of the class includes supplies but pay attention to the fine print when signing up.

2. Take a class at a local craft store or boutique. The craft store chains are starting to pick up on this “do-it-yourself” trend by carrying jewelry-making supplies. They often offer classes for items they carry in the store so check the schedule at the locations in your area. They also usually offer a discount on supplies for those who are taking the courses they offer. Don’t forget the small boutiques too! We have a locally owned bead store in our city that offers classes on body jewelry. You may have something like that near you.

3. Search the internet for how-to videos. If you can’t find anything local or your prefer to learn at your own pace, you can be sure there is something on the web to help you out: videos, articles, etc. You can also find supplies online.

Once you get started, you should be able to make your own barbells, posts studded with jewels or gems that you like and more. There is no end to the body jewelry you can create!

What is the Best Metal For Body Jewelry?

Two of the most common issues with body piercings are allergic reactions and infection. Correct care and cleaning of piercings are crucial, but the type of metal in the piercing jewelry you choose is also very important. The following are the top 3 best metals for body jewelry, and two choices that you should stay away from.

THE 3 BEST METALS FOR BODY JEWELRY:

#1 Implant Grade Titanium

Titanium is by far the metal of choice for body piercing jewelry, and can be safely used for initial piercings. Implant grade titanium G23 (Ti6al4v-ELI) is the type of titanium used in surgical implants, is biocompatible, resistant to body fluids and nickel free. Titanium is also stronger and lighter than steel, which gives us body piercing jewelry that is both durable, comfortable and nearly without scratches. Titanium is an expensive metal, but well worth the slightly higher price. Titanium body jewelry is beautiful, it lasts, and will look (just the same after many years of wear.

#2 Surgical Stainless Steel

Stainless steel is the most common metal for body piercing jewelry, and is just behind titanium when it comes to biocompatibility. 316L or 316LVM are the only two grades of stainless steel that are considered safe for wearing in healed piercings. Keep in mind that even the best grades of stainless steel do contain nickel and may cause problems for those who are allergic to nickel. Some countries have banned the use of stainless steel for initial piercings, and it is best to steer clear of stainless steel altogether until after your piercing is completely.

#3 Gold

Although it is beautiful, gold is not the best choice for body jewelry, especially for initial piercings or long term wear. Because gold is a softer metal and is made with metal alloys, there is a somewhat higher risk of irritation or infection. Gold jewelry is beautiful, but should only be worn in healed piercings, and with care. Replace gold body jewelry with titanium at the first sign of irritation.

NOT RECOMMENDED:

Sterling Silver: Do not purchase any body jewelry where the part that threads under your skin (barbell, banana, ring) is made of silver. Sterling silver tarnishes when it comes in contact with body fluids, can easily harbor bacterial growth, and can contain allergy-causing metals such as nickel. Body jewelry where a sterling silver “charm” that is attached to or dangles from the end of the steel or titanium bar is perfectly fine, so long as you aren’t allergic to silver jewelry. Just make sure that the part that is inside your body is made from a more biocompatible metal.

Mystery Metal: Scary. Any “costume” or “plated” body jewelry is a bad idea, and so is poor quality stainless steel. Stick with the top 3 choices above to be sure your piercing stays irritation and infection-free.

Remember that a body piercing jewelry is placed inside you, and should be treated more like a surgical implant than a piece of costume jewelry. Although it may be tempting to buy cheaper body jewelry, spending a little more on higher quality jewelry is definitely a better way to go in the long run.

Will Body Jewelry Make Your Good Kid Bad?

Every day I am more and more amazed at how fast my daughter is growing. It seems like the last time I looked, she was eight. Now she’s going on fifteen. I’m so proud of the young person she’s becoming. She is an excellent student and a good athlete and wants to go far in life. So when she displays interests or behaviors that are really very common to kids her age, I get shocked and find myself unable to process her feelings.

It seems many of her friends are advancing from standard ear piercings to other forms of body jewelry. I’ve seen one girl with a tragus and another with an eyebrow ring. While these forms of adornment won’t be condoned by my daughter’s coach, she still longs for other more questionable body jewelry.

Where her father and I struggle is with the notion of restricting her from something that she obviously thinks is important. Wouldn’t that seem like punishment to a kid who excels and performs at almost everything she does? It would be easier to say “no” to body jewelry if she were a poor student or constantly had to be talked to about her behavior or attitude. That’s not the case here.

On the other hand, we aren’t parents to be friends. Parenting is parenting, and sometimes that means standing firm with rules you believe will serve the best long-term interests of your child, like body jewelry. If this sounds like something you’re experiencing, I’d encourage you to talk openly and honestly with your kid about your concerns. They need to know why you don’t support the idea, lest they think you don’t care about their interests or don’t believe they’re living up to other expectations. If you just deliver an arbitrary “no!” without explanation, your good kid just might rebel.